8 Things to Consider When Looking for a Personal Injury Lawyer

When you’ve been injured in an accident, you are likely trying to figure out whether you need a lawyer. Although you certainly can file an insurance claim on your own, most would agree that a la...

When you’ve been injured in an accident, you are likely trying to figure out whether you need a lawyer. Although you certainly can file an insurance claim on your own, most would agree that a lawyer is a valuable resource. 

A personal injury lawyer in Baton Rouge recommends at least talking to their firm before making a decision. They offer free case consultations, so injury victims can learn of their options before deciding whether to hire a lawyer. Here are five things to consider when looking for the right injury lawyer for you.

1. Are They Experienced with Your Type of Injury Case?

There are many different ways a person can be injured in an accident. There are also a number of laws that correspond to different case types. 

For instance, if you are injured by a medical professional, your case will be handled much differently than a car accident injury case.

It’s imperative you find a lawyer who is experienced handling cases like yours. You can ask a lawyer straight out whether they’ve dealt with your type of personal injury case. You can also ask them to show you past case results.

2. How Many Years Have They Been Practicing Personal Injury Law?

Although there’s an argument to be made for the usefulness of youthful exuberance, most people hope that the law firm they end up with has a least one attorney with considerable experience in the field. You want to know that the firm you choose knows the ropes. You don’t want to be the experiment they learn from.

You care about receiving justice and compensation for your personal injury. You want to consider experience level when making a decision about which personal injury lawyer you go with.

3. Consider the Size of the Firm

The larger the firm, the less personalized attention you are likely to receive. This works for some people because there are benefits to large firms. They have significant resources, for instance. If one attorney is stuck on your case, they might be able to get help from others at the firm.

You need to figure out what type of firm you’re interested in. Do you want to work directly with your attorney? Do you want a personal relationship with your attorney or with your attorney’s secretary or paralegal? 

4. Does the Attorney Have Litigation Experience?

Many personal injury cases will never go to trial, but that doesn’t mean yours won’t. There’s always a possibility that your case will go to court. You probably want to make sure you have a lawyer who can handle the courtroom. You at least want to have a lawyer who isn’t fearful of going to court. 

5. Consider an Attorney Who Will Work Out a Contingency Fee Arrangement with You

Contingency fees are when the attorney agrees to take your personal injury case on the condition that you pay them for their services when your case is won. You don’t pay anything upfront and only pay your attorney from your settlement. This is of great benefit to injury victims who don’t have a lot of money to pay a lawyer. 

6. How Busy Is the Firm or the Attorney?

When you are looking for a lawyer, you want to consider how busy the firm is. This might seem difficult to decipher, but during an initial meeting you should be able to get a sense of this. Are people rushing around, looking a bit frantic? Are you feeling pushed out the door?

You should be able to tell whether the attorney is going to have enough time to give your case the attention it deserves. There’s no use in finding the best attorney in town if they don’t have the time needed to devote to your case. You want to be treated like a person, and not like a case to be closed.

Even if an attorney or a firm seems like a good fit for you, it might not be if they simply have too many cases. Move on to another firm, and find one that has time to devote to you.

7. Does Your Attorney Seem to Get You and Your Goals?

Sometimes, people just don’t get along. It’s no one’s fault, really. It’s just that the personalities don’t mesh, or the two people have different goals. This is absolutely true of the lawyer/client relationship. You want to have an attorney who gets you. Really gets you. You want an attorney who knows what your goals are and will strive to achieve them.

If you find yourself constantly at odds with your lawyer, you might be at the wrong place. Look for someone who understands your needs and will do everything they can to meet them. Someone who won’t put their own needs above yours. 

For instance, if you want to settle a case, but your attorney is pushing you to go to trial, this might not be the attorney for you. If you want to go to trial, but your attorney keeps pressuring you to settle, this might not be the attorney for you. Keep looking until you find your unicorn.

8. Consider the Location of the Firm

Sometimes, location matters. If you want to be able to see and speak to your attorney on a regular basis, you might want to find one who is close to where you live. Many people don’t realize how important it is to be able to see their attorney regularly. It will depend on your case how often you need to meet with your attorney, but it could be crucial for your case.

If your attorney’s office is far away, this can really make the personal injury claim process difficult for you. Also, if your attorney is far awayFind Article, will they consider coming to you or meeting in the middle? Many injury victims aren’t mobile after an accident. Is your attorney willing to make your life easier by meeting at your home?

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Allan Gregory is an author, designer, engineer, artist, playwright, and comedy writer. His work across multiple disciplines broadly addresses narratives of human experience. As a playwright, Allan has had his pieces performed at multiple play houses. As an artist and illustrator, he has had his art exhibited at multiple galleries. His work has appeared on a number of online and offline outlets. 

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